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Today's News

  • Mills, Fremont Counties Begin Attorney-sharing Agreement

    Naeda Elliott will serve as the county attorney for both Mills and Fremont County in 2019 and possibly through 2022 under terms of a 28-E agreement signed last February by elected officials from both counties.

    The unique arrangement was broached last winter by Fremont County as a way for the neighboring counties to provide “county attorney services to their respective counties in a more economical manner through sharing the services of a single, multicounty county attorney office,” according to language of the 28-E.

  • Christmas Spirit, Trees Abound At Sawtooth Farm

    For Norm and Gretchen Riemersma and their daughter Rachel, growing and selling fresh Christmas trees is more about tradition, spreading holiday cheer and catching up with old friends than it is about the bottom line of their family business.

  • Glenwood Girl Serving As Iowa Kid Captain

    Long road trips to the University of Iowa are nothing new for Livia Jackson.

    For the past six years, the 10-year-old daughter of Jonathan and Holly Jackson of Glenwood has been receiving treatment at the University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital for Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome (CVS), a rare condition characterized by recurring and prolonged episodes of intense nausea and vomiting, occasional abdominal pain and intense headaches.

  • Judge gives Frazier mandatory sentence

    Last month, Misty Frazier was found guilty of child endangerment causing death for giving her 8-year-old daughter Kathleen a fatal dose of a powerful antidepressant in 2016.

    On Thursday, Frazier was sentenced to up to 50 years in prison but with good behavior and an early parole, could be out of prison in just one year.

  • East Mills teacher, coach facing sexual abuse charges

    An East Mills coach and teacher was arrested and charged with sexual abuse and two counts of sexual exploitation by a school employee for two incidents involving a juvenile female.

  • When Bowling Was King

    Tina Stanley-Beardmore had a difficult time watching the demolition of the bowling alley her grandfather built nearly 60 years ago.

    The Stanley Bowl – Midwest Lanes building at 601 S. Locust St. in  Glenwood was leveled earlier this month by a construction crew to make way for a new Casey’s General Store, projected to open in 2019.

    “Watching it get knocked down was hard, I had a lump in my throat,” Beardmore said. “My family has a lot of memories from that building.”

  • Accident Claims Life Of Longtime Glenwood Resource Center Greenhouse Manager Kevin Lingren

    A celebration of life for Kevin Lingren, manager and caretaker of the Glenwood Resource Center greenhouse for over 40 years, is scheduled for Thursday, Aug. 23, at the GRC Visitor’s Center at 2:30 p.m. A celebration of life is also planned for Sunday, Aug. 26, from 2 – 5 p.m., at the Albion Country Club in Albion, Neb.

  • Frazier found responsible for young daughter’s death

    COUNCIL BLUFFS - Misty Frazier has been found guilty of child endangerment resulting in the death of her daughter after giving the 8-year-old a fatal dose of a powerful antidepressant in 2016.

    Frazier, 34, of Glenwood, had been charged with second-degree murder, child endangerment causing death and distribution of a prescription drug to a minor in the death of her daughter, Kathleen Tafta, on Oct. 19, 2016.

    Prosecutors alleged Frazier had been dosing her daughter with amitriptyline several weeks leading up to her death.

  • Just Like Old Times

    There’s a few moans, a few groans and an occasional  whisper of “I’m not sure I can still do that anymore,” but for the most part, the “alumni” from Gary’s Tumbling in Glenwood have picked right up where they left off so many years ago.

    For the past month, about a dozen graduates of Gary Giaffoglione’s nearly three-decade old tumbling program have been hitting the mats on Wednesday nights to perform aerials, back tucks, airplanes, somersaults and more. There’s a lot of laughter and reminiscing about old times.

  • Return To Little Sioux

    Mason Flora has a tattoo just above his heart.

    It features the date June 11, 2008, and a tornado, inked like a merit badge one might see on a Boy Scout sash.

    For Flora, the tattoo marks a day he’ll never forget.

    On June 11, 2008, Flora, then 15 years old, was one of nearly  100 scouts camping out at the Little Sioux Scout Ranch when a fast-moving, rain-wrapped tornado sprung from a thunderstorm and roared through the 1,800-acre campground south of Sioux City.