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Government

  • Citizens Voice Concerns Before City Adopts Budget

    The Glenwood City Council approved its preliminary budget for the 2016-2017 fiscal year following a 34-minute public hearing at City Hall last Tuesday, April 12.

    City council members unanimously approved the $4.1 million budget, despite a projected shortfall of up to $300,000 in its general fund account.

  • Mills County Attorney Submits Resignation

    Mills County is in the market for a new county attorney following the surprise resignation of Tricia McSorely.

    Less than half way through the four-year term she was elected to serve in November 2014, McSorley has tendered her resignation to take a position with an insurance firm in Omaha. Her last day on the job will be April 22.

    “It’s a good move for my family,” McSorley said. “It’s a job opportunity that came up that I really couldn’t pass up.”

  • Deficit Projected In City's 2016-2017 Fiscal Year Budget

    The Glenwood City Council will be asked to approve a budget next week with the understanding that the deficit in its general fund account will be prolonged for at least another year.

    A public hearing for the 2017 fiscal year budget and a vote for council approval will take place Tuesday, April 12, 7 p.m., at City Hall.

  • County Tax Levy On Decline For 2nd Straight Year

    The Mills County Board of Supervisors has approved the county’s $18.5 million budget for the 2016-2017 fiscal year.

    Next year’s county budget is up slightly from the 2015-2016 fiscal year, which ends June 30, but does reflect a second straight year of decline in the tax levy, from the current rate of 9.633319 (per taxable $1,000 valuation) to the proposed 9.40932 in rural areas of the county. Residents living in incorporated areas within the county would see their tax rate dip from 6.41855 to 6.19468.

  • City Seeks 6-month Contract With Interim Financial Manaqer

    It appears the Glenwood City Council is content on putting off the hiring of a new city administrator for at least six months while the services of an interim financial manager are utilized.

  • Glenwood Cemetery Lot Fees Could Be Going Up

    The fee for purchasing a lot at the Glenwood Cemetery could be going up.

    At the recommendation of the Glenwood Cemetery Board, the Glenwood City Council is considering a proposal that would raise the cost of a lot at the Glenwood Cemetery from $600 to $650.

    In a meeting with city council members last week, Glenwood Cemetery sexton Mike Collins said the $650 lot fee would keep Glenwood’s pricing lower than Council Bluffs’, but higher than some other southwest communities outside the Omaha-Council Bluffs metro area.

  • Glenwood City Administrator Terminated

    After meeting in closed session for more than two hours at its regular meeting Tuesday, Feb. 9, the Glenwood City Council fired city administrator / financial director Brian Kissel.

  • Dirt Dig Case Going To Trial Feb. 9

    A group of Mineola residents fighting a dirt dig site in their neighborhood will finally have their day in court Feb. 9.
    Omaha attorney Terry White, on behalf of nine plaintiffs, filed suit last April against the Mills County Board of Adjustment for its controversial decision to grant a special use permit to Cory Leick to extract dirt from a 40-acre parcel west of Mineola along Barrus Road and 237th Street.

  • Leaky Roof Remains A Concern At Library

    More than two years after a nearly $200,000 restoration project was completed at the Glenwood Public Library, the facility continues to be plagued by a leaky roof.

    Library board member Terry Craig voiced concerns about the leak to members of the Glenwood City Council at a meeting in late December, noting the situation has existed for several months.

  • 'No Regrets'

    Kim Clark’s political career owes a lot to the advice she didn’t take.

    Clark, who wrapped up her third and final term in the Glenwood Mayor’s Office Jan. 1, decided to run for the Glenwood City Council nearly a decade ago on essentially a whim.

    “There was no one running in Ward 3,” said Clark, who is a 15-year deputy with the Mills County Sheriff’s Office. “And I got elected on a write in. It was just a spur of the moment thing that lasted 10 years.”